Leaf Pricing announced by Nissan

The web's first forum dedicated to Nissan's groundbreaking electric car, the Nissan Leaf.
User avatar
relytgerg
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri Nov 13, 2009 8:19 am

Nissan Leaf Pricing has been announced!

Postby relytgerg » Tue Mar 30, 2010 8:41 am

I received an email about Leaf pricing. It points to a link:http://www.nissanusa.com/leaf-...s.HRN that announces MSRP at $32,780 not counting government rebates and leasing at $349/month for 36 months with a $1,999 initial payment. It also states that they'll be taking reservations soon.
Modified by relytgerg at 10:29 AM 4/5/2010


User avatar
Eikon
Posts: 11036
Joined: Sat Apr 24, 2004 3:20 am
Car: 71 240z, 93 Supra TT
Location: Lake Orion, MI
Contact:

Leaf Pricing announced by Nissan

Postby Eikon » Tue Mar 30, 2010 6:28 pm

http://www.nissanusa.com/leaf-.../news

As low as $25,280 ($32,780 MSRP minus up to $7,500 federal tax credit)Lease world's first mass-marketed EV for $349 per month

FRANKLIN, Tenn. (March 30, 2010) - Nissan North America, Inc. (NNA) today announced U.S. pricing for the 2011 Nissan LEAF electric vehicle, which becomes available for purchase or lease at Nissan dealers in select markets in December and nationwide in 2011. Nissan will begin taking consumer reservations for the Nissan LEAF April 20.

Including the $7,500 federal tax credit for which the Nissan LEAF will be fully eligible, the consumer's after-tax net value of the vehicle will be $25,280. The Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price *(MSRP) for the 2011 all-electric, zero-emission Nissan LEAF is $32,780, which includes three years of roadside assistance. Additionally, there is an array of state and local incentives that may further defray the costs and increase the benefits of owning and charging a Nissan LEAF - such as a $5,000 statewide tax rebate in California; a $5,000 tax credit in Georgia; a $1,500 tax credit in Oregon; and carpool-lane access in some states, including California.

As a result of aggressive pricing and the availability of the $7,500 federal tax credit whose benefit is immediately included, Nissan will be able to offer a monthly lease payment beginning at $349, not including state or local incentives, which could further reduce the net cost of the Nissan LEAF.

"Imagine the possibility of never needing to go to a gas station again. Or of paying less than $3 for 100 miles behind the wheel. Or of creating zero emissions while driving," said Brian Carolin, senior vice president, Sales and Marketing, NNA. "Nissan leads the industry by offering the first affordable, zero-emission vehicle for the mass market. Nissan LEAF truly is in a class by itself."

The vehicle at the standard SV trim level is well-equipped with a variety of standard features, including an advanced navigation system and Internet/smart phone connectivity to the vehicle, including pre-heat/pre-cool and charging control. Nissan LEAF is equipped with energy-efficient LED headlights and makes extensive use of recycled and recyclable materials, such as seat fabric, instrument panel materials, and front- and rear-bumper fascias. Other standard amenities include Bluetooth connectivity; Intelligent-key with push button start; Sirius/XM satellite radio capabilities and roadside assistance. Safety features include vehicle dynamic control (stability control), traction control and six airbags. The SL trim level, available for an additional $940 (MSRP), adds features including rearview monitor, solar panel spoiler, fog lights, and automatic headlights.

Reservations & Purchase

In order to ensure a one-stop-shop customer experience, Nissan is carefully managing the purchase process from the first step, when consumers sign up on NissanUSA.com, until the customer takes the Nissan LEAF home and plugs it into a personal charging dock.

* Nissan begins accepting reservations on April 20 first from people who have signed up on NissanUSA.com, and, after a brief introductory period, to all interested consumers. * Consumers will be required to pay a $99 reservation fee, which is fully refundable. * Reserving a Nissan LEAF ensures consumers a place in line when Nissan begins taking firm orders in August, as well as access to special, upcoming Nissan LEAF events. * Rollout to select markets begins in December, with nationwide availability in 2011.

Charging Equipment

In tandem with the purchase process, Nissan will offer personal charging docks, which operate on a 220-volt supply, as well as their installation. Nissan is providing these home-charging stations, which will be built and installed by AeroVironment, as part of a one-stop-shop process that includes a home assessment.

* The average cost for the charging dock plus installation will be $2,200. * Charging dock and installation are eligible for a 50 percent federal tax credit up to $2,000. * Using current national electricity averages, Nissan LEAF will cost less than $3 to "fill up." * Nissan LEAF also will be the sole vehicle available as part of The EV Project, which is led by EV infrastructure provider eTec, a division of ECOtality, and will provide free home-charging stations and installation for up to 4,700 Nissan LEAF owners in those markets.

In North America, Nissan's operations include automotive design, engineering, consumer and corporate financing, sales and marketing, distribution and manufacturing. Nissan is dedicated to improving the environment under the Nissan Green Program 2010, whose key priorities are reducing CO2 emissions, cutting other emissions and increasing recycling. More information on the Nissan LEAF and zero emissions can be found at http://www.NissanUsa.com.

User avatar
Eikon
Posts: 11036
Joined: Sat Apr 24, 2004 3:20 am
Car: 71 240z, 93 Supra TT
Location: Lake Orion, MI
Contact:

Postby Eikon » Tue Mar 30, 2010 11:29 pm

Looks like the "low price" will be sending a few waves through the industry.

http://autos.yahoo.com/article...r-25k/

NEW YORK – Nissan's new electric car will cost just over $25,000 when it goes on sale in the U.S. in December, aiming to bring gasoline-free technology within reach of mainstream drivers.

The Leaf, a four-door hatchback, will have a base price of $32,780, but it's eligible for a $7,500 federal tax credit for electric vehicles. That will make it cheaper to buy than electric vehicles coming from rivals and may force competitors to cut prices. But the Leaf's limited range of just 100 miles per charge for its lithium-ion battery could be a dealbreaker for some motorists.

"We want to make sure the car is affordable, ready for the mass market and has mass appeal," Mark Perry, director of product planning and advanced technology at Nissan North America Inc., said in an interview.

Customers can start reserving a Leaf in the U.S. on April 20 and Nissan is aiming for 25,000 orders by December. It hopes to build and sell 50,000 of the cars around the world during the first model year. Production is starting at an existing factory in Oppama, Japan, south of Tokyo, and will expand to Nissan's factory in Smyrna, Tenn., in 2012.

Christopher Richter, an auto analyst at CLSA Asia Pacific Markets in Tokyo, predicted the car will prove popular among "people who want to be green, people who love technology and people who are status-conscious."

Sales during the first year will be limited to about 20 large cities in the U.S., including New York, Seattle and Atlanta, Perry said. He said Nissan hopes to expand Leaf sales nationwide by the end of 2011.

The Leaf's relatively low starting price — as well as an option to lease the vehicle for $349 a month — could touch off a price war among rivals. A spokesman for General Motors Co., which will begin selling its Chevrolet Volt electric car later this year, said it will look at Nissan's pricing before announcing its own closer to its December sales date.

The Volt is widely expected to cost around $35,000 before the $7,500 tax credit. Unlike the Leaf, the Volt is not a pure electric car. Instead it's propelled by electricity stored in a battery for up to 40 miles, at which point a gasoline engine kicks in, giving it hundreds of miles more in range.

Perry said the Leaf's 100-mile range is more than adequate for the distance driven by most Americans in a given day. Still, analysts say the psychological effect of so-called range anxiety might be an obstacle for the Leaf. The Volt's internal combustion engine eases that concern by allowing drivers to continue going long after the electric charge is depleted.

"The Volt ... has a much larger appeal," said Aaron Bragman, an auto industry analyst with IHS Global Insight in Troy, Mich.

It will take about eight hours to recharge a Leaf using a 220-volt electric plug — the kind used by most electric clothes dryers. Charging using a standard 110-volt outlet could take twice that. Nissan is giving Leaf customers the option of buying a home charging station at an estimated cost, including installation, of $2,200. That cost can be offset by a 50-percent tax credit up to $2,000.

At average electricity rates, charging the Leaf would cost about $2.80 per charge.

The Volt has a smaller battery than the Leaf and can't go as far on full electric power. But it can be fully recharged in eight hours on a standard 110-volt home outlet. Using a 220-volt outlet, it takes less than four hours.

The Leaf and the Volt will be the first among many electric cars due from mainstream automakers in the coming years. Until now, electric cars like the two-seater Tesla Roadster with a price tag of $100,000 have largely been playthings of the wealthy.

Tax credits for plug-in electric vehicles top out at $7,500. The size of the credit shrinks by automaker after it's sold at least 200,000 vehicles in the U.S. The credit then phases out over a year.

Nissan says the Leaf will cost 3.76 million yen ($40,000) in Japan. It will price the car lower in the U.S. because it wants to sell more of them in that market. But Perry said Nissan is confident the company will make a profit on each Leaf sold in the U.S. at a lower list price.

One reason is because Nissan owns the intellectual property to the battery, which was developed jointly by Nissan and NEC. "We control the battery costs," Perry said.

But Nissan may be deliberately setting the price low and may even lose money to establish itself as the market leader, said Erich Merkle, president of the consulting company Autoconomy.com in Grand Rapids, Mich.

Although the Volt can travel farther on a single charge, GM still has to compete with the Leaf on price, especially among motorists who have short commutes or a second car for long-distance travel, Merkle said.

So far, some 81,000 people in the U.S. — where the Leaf went on a promotional 22-city tour earlier this year — have said they are interested in the car via Nissan's Web site. In Japan some 9,300 people have signaled an interest.

Nissan CEO Carlos Ghosn, who also heads France's Renault, has been a vocal proponent of electric vehicles, and predicts the segment will grow to about 10 percent of global sales by 2020.

toovo1985
Posts: 14
Joined: Wed Feb 24, 2010 4:53 am

Re: Leaf Pricing announced by Nissan (Eikon)

Postby toovo1985 » Mon Apr 05, 2010 5:11 am

I'm really curious to see how the reservations and saes will start. Don't know if the first EV's will be worth the price that the brands will be asking. I think many people will wait to get the first reactions...I would do that...

User avatar
AZhitman
Administrator
Posts: 71007
Joined: Mon Apr 29, 2002 2:04 am
Car: 58 L210, 70 240Z, 75 240Z RB25, 63 Bluebird RHD, 63 NL320, 67 WRL411, 67 SPL311, 68 510 SR, 77 620 SR20, 79 210, 92 SE-R, 97 D21, 98 S14, 12 Titan 4x4.
Location: Surprise, Arizona
Contact:

Postby AZhitman » Mon Apr 05, 2010 6:04 am

I think we may throw in our deposit and be an early buyer.

User avatar
relytgerg
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri Nov 13, 2009 8:19 am

Whether and when to buy or lease

Postby relytgerg » Mon Apr 05, 2010 7:18 am

I am definitely reserving one as soon as they open up reservations. After all, it's a refundable deposit so if I change my mind before the time comes I can get it back. However, if I decide to go forward with obtaining one, I want my place in line.

The main question for me will be whether to purchase or lease. The advantage to purchasing will be that the overall out of pocket costs will probably be lower and I'll own the vehicle even if Nissan changes their mind and stops selling them.

The advantage to leasing is that if there are significant 1st model year problems, I'm not stuck with the car, I just give it back at the end of the lease.

Of course, since central New York state won't be in their list of initial markets I will probably have until well into 2011 to decide.

toovo1985
Posts: 14
Joined: Wed Feb 24, 2010 4:53 am

Re: Leaf Pricing announced by Nissan

Postby toovo1985 » Mon Apr 19, 2010 8:03 am

I would go for the leasing...we still don't know what to expect from the electric cars yet...as always the japanese will be the first to experience the technological improvements...so let's hope to see what they think...


Return to “Leaf Forum”