FAQ's: Look Here Before Creating a Thread

1980-1986 Datsun 720 forums. All 720-specific topics and discussion can be found here.
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pejsa s-13
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the frequently asked, spark plug wire order, easy to figure out

Postby pejsa s-13 » Sun Nov 29, 2009 1:55 pm

im thinking this should be stickied in here

well here it is

I= intake sideE=exhaust side

from the top of your distributor going counter clockwise.2I, 4E, 1I, 2E, 3I, 1E, 4I, 3E...

this was very helpfull to me and i hope it can help some of you guys.
Modified by pejsa s-13 at 9:08 PM 12/23/2009


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FN-QR

Postby PEZi » Sun Nov 29, 2009 2:18 pm

What Aftermarket Carb Options Are There For My Truck?: All carbs from Weber are a great choice. Specifically, the 32/36 DGEV, the 34 DGEC, the 36 DGEC and the 38 DGES are recommended for the Z24 and can be found reliably at http://www.webercarbsdirect.com at a reasonable price. You can also run dual side draft carbs with a custom intake manifold but the expertise needed to do so is a little higher than a simple down draft replacement.

What Aftermarket Exhaust Should I Use On My Truck?: The aftermarket support for these trucks is not what most of us would like it to be, so a custom catback system is the best and only way to go. Keep the piping below 2.5" in order to retain the low end torque of the engine, 2.25" is what works best. Then pick your favorite muffler and/or resonator for the sound and decibel level you want. Under the bed dump, side or rear exits all work fine but keep in mind that when the piping does not exit the vehicle completely, the resonance can be annoying in the cab.

Aftermarket high flow catalytic converters can be found as well, the ones from MAGNAFLOW tend to have the best results. Custom test pipes an also be made cheap at local shops or if you want to hone your welding skills you can make one yourself.

Headers can be found from both Pacesetter Performance as well as Doug Thorley. They have both been used with success, the Thorley headers allowing for slightly better gains. The Pacesetter ones can be found for about $150 and the Thorley's for about $250.

I Want To Lower My Truck, How Can I Do It?: Lowering a 720 is relatively easy, all it involves is lowering the torsion bars in the front and adding lowering blocks in the rear ( CLICK HERE FOR A GUIDE ). There are also the options of lowering shackles for the front and leaf spring re-arches for the rear.... both of which cost a little more.

My Truck Runs Rough/ Doesn't Idle Properly Anymore/ Has Poor Performance, What Went Wrong?: Before making a new thread on this subject, please check all your vacuum lines first. A lot of the problems that these trucks have can be traced back to vac lines. To test, use carb cleaner at all of the vacuum line connections and look for irregularities. If you live in a non smog testing area and you don't necessarily care for keeping the maze of vac lines in tact, the only one necessary for your truck to run right is the one going to the carb/intake to the distributor (distributor advance), all others can be removed and plugged.

If you have not changed the lines since owning the truck, do that immediately. Lines become cracked and rotted over time and that leads to problems.

A few other things that come up often when the truck is not running properly are related to spark and fuel. If you've never replaced the distributor cap, do so. Also make sure you are running good spark plugs and wires. The fuel delivery can also be off, this can be from an old pump, clogged lines, old tank, clogged fuel filter or even a fuel leak.

If you've checked these things, or don't believe that these are the issues you're facing, then create a thread about your issue.. but please make sure you know that the things mentioned above are not what you're looking at.

Tune Up Data

Spark plug types

1980 - US BP6ES-11 Canadian standard/us optional- BP6ES

1981-1985 - Intake side BPRS6ES Exhaust Side BPRS5ES

1986-1989 - 4cyl - BPRS5ES V6 - BPRS5ES-11

1990 and after KA24E - ZFR5E-11 V6 - BKR6EY

Spark Plug Gap

1980 - 0.039 to 0.043 in 1.0-1.1mm

1981-1989 - 4cyl - 0.031 to 0.035 in 0.8-0.9mm

1981- 1989 - V6 - 0.039 to 0.043 in 1.0-1.1mm

1990 and after 4cyl - 0.040 in 1.0mm

1990 and after V6 - 0.031 to 0.035 in 0.8-0.9mm

Valve Clearances

1980 intake HOT 0.010in 0.25mm COLD 0.007in 0.17mm1980 exhaust HOT 0.012in 0.30mm COLD 0.009in 0.24mm

1981-1989 Intake HOT 0.012in 0.30mm COLD 0.008in 0.21mm1981-1989 Intake HOT 0.012in 0.30mm COLD 0.009in 0.24mm

1990 and after have Hydraulic

Firing Order 4cyl 1-3-2-4

Firing Order V6 1-2-3-4-5-6

Random Engine InfoL18 is a 1770cc engine produced from 1972 through 1976. It produces 105 hp (78 kW)

L20B is a 1952cc engine produced from 1975 through 1985. It produces 100 hp (75 kW) in 1981 form with 112 lb·ft (152 N·m) of torque as installed in the 200 SX.

Z22 (carb only) is a 2.2 L engine produced from 1981 through 1983. It produces 86hp (64kW).

Z24 is a 2.4 L (2389 cc) engine produced from 1983 through August 1989. A fuel injected version (Z24i) was produced starting in April 1985. It produces 103 hp (77 kW).

Note: All Z20, Z22 and Z24 engines were known as NAPS-Z (NAPZ or NAPEZ) engines. NAPS for Nissan Anti-Pollution System. NAPZ motors had dual sparkplugs per cylinder except the pre-82 versions and later versions of the Z24 as fitted to the Pathfinder. However all NAPZ engines sold in California reportedly had dual plug heads regardless of the year.

The fuel injected version referenced above was denoted as the Z24i (Throttle Body Fuel Injection) and was first available in the Nissan Model 720 ST pickup during the 1986 crossover year to the (1986.5) D21 Hardbody and was later replaced by the KA24E engine. Beside fuel injection, a significant change for the Z24i was the addition of an optical crank angle sensor in the distributor rather than a vacuum advance and ignition module. This allowed for more precise engine management for the fuel injection system.

The General Specifications for the Z24 are:

Engine Type: - Inline 4 cylinder 4 Stroke Engine Displacement - 2389 cc (146.8 c.i.) Bore x Stroke:- 89.0 × 96.0 mm (3.50 x 3.78 in) Compression Ratio:- 8.3 : 1

Power Ratings were:

* Z24

Years - 1984 - 1986 Power - 103 hp (77 kW) @ 4800 rpm Torque - 134 ft·lbf (182 N·m) @ 2800 rpm

* z24i

Years - 1986 - 1987 Power - 103 hp (77 kW) @ 4800 rpm Torque - 134 ft·lbf (182 N·m) @ 2800 rpm

Years - 1988 - 1989 Power - 106 hp (79 kW) @ 4800 rpm Torque - 137 ft·lbf (186 N·m) @ 2400 rpm

KA24E is a 3 valve/cylinder engine. Two intake valves and one exhaust valve, Single OverHead Cam design. 134 hp @ 5200 rpm and 154 lb*ft torque @ 3600 rpm. Installed in 1990-1997 Hardbody trucks. The info above is for the KA24DE, which was installed in the 1998+ Frontier trucks (among other Nissan vehicles)240SX models made before February of 1989 utilized the KA24E with a 9.1:1 compression ratio, outputting approximately 150 hp. After February of 1989, however, the compression ratio was reduced to 8.6:1 causing the KA24E to produce the advertised 140 hp.

The KA24E uses Sequential Electronic Fuel Injection (SEFI). The ECM controls each injector individually, releasing fuel into each cylinder on its intake stroke.

The KA24E is a reliable engine that can withstand substantial power increases on stock internals. This is due to the use of forged connecting rods and an internally balanced one-piece cast crankshaft.

Datsun 720 pick-up Truck

Regular cab and King Cab models came with regular and long bed options.

Regular Cab

720 King Cab A 4-door variant offered in some overseas markets.

Also, a utility body style like the Later Nissan Pathfinder was also available. These were called Bushwackers or Trail Hustlers, only available as an aftermarket conversion) "As I under stand it, A number of 720's were purchased by dealers and shipped to Arizona to be modified. These were standard cab tracks with sunroofs, 4x4, A/C and a permanent cap over the bed with welded in hoops to make a semi caged rear."

1984 Trail Hustler

Early (1980–1983) models had single wall beds with protruding side lips and rope ties, 2 faux hood vents, and tail lights on the lower rear valance.

For a limited period, 1983.5-1984 models built in the USA had the single wall beds with rope ties, yet used tail lights on the rear bed corners with amber turn signals over the red stop/tail lights while the backup lights remained under the tailgate. The front end underwent transformation as well, with a larger grill, bumper, and corner lights. There was also a revised dashboard with round instead of square gauges. At the same time, the regular cab was lengthened slightly and the air extractor vents behind the cab doors changed from the high "flag" look to long, narrow ones that matched the height of the window opening. The cab of King Cabs was unchanged.

Finally, the late model trucks produced from 1985 - 1986.5 utilized double wall, smooth sided beds, with revised tail lights on the corners which resembled those on Chevrolet/GMC S-series trucks. Some overseas models continued with the early style beds.

Other US model variations besides KC (King Cab) were the GL (???), DX (deluxe), ST (sport truck) and Cab and Chassis models (2wd only).

The Datsun 720 was available in both 2WD and 4WD configurations, although prior to 1984 the front suspension in 4WD models was an adaptation of the 2WD suspension.

In 1979.5 and 1980, models were powered by Datsun's 2.0L carbureted L20B engine.

In the Middle East it was powered by Datsun's 1.8L carbureted L18 engine.

The 1981-1982 models used the Z22 carbureted 2.2L engine and an optional SD22 Diesel.

In mid-1983 Nissan introduced the Z24 2.4 Liter 8 spark plugs 4 cylinder motor, it produces 103 hp (77 kW), Z20 2.0 Liter and the SD25 Diesel; this happened at the same time that the 720 series was marketed as a Nissan (the Datsun name, which had disappeared entirely after 1984, was now only seen below the Nissan name on the left corner of the tailgate).

In the American market the diesel engine was only available in the 2WD 720 (from 1982 to 1985). The Z24 was upgraded to Z24i fuel-injection (option) for the 1986 models. Additionally, some overseas markets received versions with the 1.5L J15, 1.6L J16 or 1.8L L18 carbureted engines. The 720 Series was never available with any of the Z22E or Z20E multi-port fuel injected engines. These engines are, however, easy to adapt and integrate into the chassis and can be found with the genuine appearance of being original equipment.

1984 720 with a NAPZ24. More To Be Added Later

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pejsa s-13
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Re: FN-QR (PEZi720)

Postby pejsa s-13 » Wed Jan 06, 2010 11:12 am

awesome every day we seem to get a new thread "my truck runs like dog poop please help"

good stuff pez

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breadbox
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Re: FAQ's: Look Here Before Creating a Thread

Postby breadbox » Sun Aug 01, 2010 11:47 am

Combination meter/gauge wattage

Illumination lamp 80-81' [1.7w]
Illumination lamp 82-later' [3.4w]
Warning Lamp [3.4w] type 158
Cigarette lighter lamp [1.4w]
4WD oil pressure gauge lamp [3.4w] type 158
4WD voltmeter lamp [3.4w] type 158
4WD indicator lamp [3.4w] type 158
HVAC control lamp [3.4w] type 158
Radio lamp [3.4w] type 158
Autoshifter lamp [3.4w] type 158
Rear defogger switch indicator lamp [1.4w]
Rear defogger switch lamp [3.4w] type 158

Fuses

Circuit [ampere rating]

1980
Headlight [20]
Tail,license,clearance,side marker,illumination,interior light [10]
Stoplight,hazardlight[15]
horn,clock [10]
radio,cigarette lighter [15]
wiper,washer,AC,Heater [15]
high power heater[20]
warning lights, guages, turnsignal[15]
engine control [10]

1981 on
Headlight 81-90[10]
Headlight 91 on [15]
Tail,license,clearance,side marker,illumination,interior light 81-90[15]
Tail,license,clearance,side marker,illumination,interior light 91 on [10]
Stoplight 81-90 [15]
Stoplight 91 on [10]
Horn [10]
Clock [10]
Radio,cigarette lighter [15]
wiper,washer,AC,heater [15]
Heater 81-90 [20]
Heater 91 on [15]
Warning lights,gauges,turn signals 81-90[15]
Warning lights,gauges,turn signals 91 on[10]
Rear defroster [15]
engine control[15]
ignition coil [10]

Fusible links
1980

Circuit [Color]
Air condition circuits [Green]
All load circuits [Red]

1981 on
Headlight circuit [Green]
Power Supply(ignition/accessory at the fuse box) [Green]
Power supply(battery fuse box) [Black]


Wiring Harness color coding
Circuit [Base Color]

Starting and ignition systems [Black (B)]
Charging System [White (W)]
Lighting System [Red (R)]
Turn signal and horn [Green(G)]
Instrument System [Yellow(Y)]
Others [Blue(L), Brown(Br), Light Green(Lg)
Grounding System [Black(B)]

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breadbox
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Re: FAQ's: Look Here Before Creating a Thread

Postby breadbox » Sun Dec 26, 2010 11:54 am

I got this out of an auto repair manual I came across and thought it would be good for some people to read on here.

PLUG CONDITIONS

Normal and excessive plug wear. It is possible to determine if the proper plug is being used by noting its physical appearance after a period of operation. If the plug has the proper heat characteristics, the insulator is tan in color, is not sooted, and the electrodes appear grayish at the point where the spark jumps the gap. Such plugs may be cleaned, regapped, and reinstalled. Worn-out electrodes and a pitted insulator are indications of 10,000 or more of service. These plugs should be replaced for better gas mileage, quicker starting, and smoother engine performance.

In a plug running too hot, the insulator is free of carbon, and its appearance ranges from a whitish in mild cases to pock-marked, blistered, and burned. The burned or blistered insulator nose and badly eroded electrodes indicate improper spark timing or low-octane fuel detonation and overheating. Lean air-fuel mixtures, cooling-system stoppages, or sticking valves may also result from this condition. As noted earlier, sustained high-speed service may require colder plugs.

Carbon-fouled plug. Has a dry, fluffy black deposit, resulting from an overrich carburetion, overchoking, sticking manifold heat valve, or clogged air cleaner. Faulty breaker points, weak coil, or capacitor, or worn ignition cables can reduce voltage and cause misfiring. Also excessive idling and at low speeds under light load can keep the engine temperatures so low that normal combustion deposits are not burned off. Try a hotter plug.


Oil Fouled plug. Wet, oily deposits may be caused by oil leaks between work piston rings and the cylinder wall. The breakin period of a new or overhauled engine may also produce this condition. A porous diaphragm in the vacuum booster pump, or excessive clearances in the valve-stem guide can also cause oil fouling. Usually, oil fouled plugs can be degreased, cleaned, and reinstalled. A hotter plug reduces the amount of oil fouling, but an engine overhaul may be necessary to correct the condition.

High-speed glazing. May cause misfiring. The shiny Deposit is usually yellow or tan. The existence of a glazed deposit suggests that the engine temperature rose suddenly during a hard acceleration, and the normal deposits did not get a chance to chip off. Instead they melted and formed a conductive, glazed coating. A colder plug and regular cleaning are recommended.

Turbulence burning. Causes electrodes to wear on one side and is the result of normal turbulent patterns in the combustion chambers of certain engines. Such burning can be ignored if normal plug life is obtained. If the gap growth seems excessive, follow corrective measures suggested for overheating.

Keywords; Burnt plugs Fouled plugs Oily plugs Spark Plug Guide What plugs can tell you
Last edited by breadbox on Mon Dec 27, 2010 3:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: FAQ's: Look Here Before Creating a Thread

Postby breadbox » Mon Dec 27, 2010 3:24 pm

Fuel-scavenger deposits. Deposits are white or yellow. The plug may appear bad, but the deposits shown are normally expected with some brand fuels. In these fuels, certain ingredients are added to change the chemical nature of the deposits on the plugs and lessen the tendency to misfire. The accumulation of the deposit on the ground electrode and shell areas may be very heavy; however, the material is easily flasked(Might be a typo and mean flaked but its is flasked in the book) off during cleaning. Such plugs are considered good and can be cleaned with standard procedures and techniques.

Preignition damage. Caused by excessive engine temperatures. Preignition produces melting of the center electrode, and eventually, of the ground electrode. The insulators appear relatively clear of deposits. Remember, a spark plug is like an electric fuse; plug melting is a warning that other troubles may exist in the engine. Check for correct plug heat range, overadvanced ignition timing, and other reasons for over heating. In its extreme condition, preignition damage usually involves the melting of the ceramic firing tip. Since such melting requires temperatures above 1700*F / 926.66*C, other engine components have probably been damaged. Careful overall inspection of the engine and adjustment of all electrical systems is needed.

Splash fouling. Sometimes occurs after a long delayed tune-up. During the delay, deposits have had adequate time to build up after continuous misfiring, and when normal combustion is restored by the tune-up, these deposits are suddenly loosened. During a highspeed run, the loosened materials are thrown against the hot insulator surface. The deposits can be removed with regular cleaning techniques, and the plugs can be reused.

Chipped insulator. Usually results from bending the center electrode during regapping of the spark plug. During engine operation, severe detonation may also split an insulator tip. The insulator chip is not likely to cause damage to the piston or cylinder bore, in a four-cycle engine, the fragment of ceramic is easily thrown out through the exhaust. When a plug is chipped replace it.

Mechanical damage. Caused by a foreign object in the combustion chamber. Small objects travel from one cylinder to another because of the overlap design of the valves. Always check the complete bank of cylinders for the presence of foreign objects when working on an engine, and never leave the carburetor throat and spark-plug holes uncovered during servicing.

Gap-tool pressure defect. An improperly used pressure-type gap tool can place an extremely high pressure on the center electrode of a spark plug and distort the negative electrode. The high pressure is caused by the compression between the end of the center electrode and the top of the shell.

Reversed polarity coil defect. The spark-plug condition caused by reversed-coil polarity is often detected by a depressed-surface (dish) effect on the shell electrode. Although the center electrode does not wear badly, it wears enough to cause inefficient engine operation. Over a period of time, excessive wear can cause both misfiring and rough idle. Install new plugs and reverse the primary leads to the ignition coil.

MichaelWR
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Car: 1986 Nissan 720 truck

Re: FAQ's: Look Here Before Creating a Thread

Postby MichaelWR » Wed Apr 27, 2011 7:55 am

Hello - I am new to the club. It is fantastic to have all of this terrific information on a dedicated site such as this. I own a 1986 720. My truck will start but will die when slowing to approach a stop sign. After the engine has warmed up it runs fine.
I have no power steering. No air. CA car. Manual transmission with 110,000 miles.
Any help would be GREATLY appreciated. Or please email to [email protected]
Many thanks :)

dreadsiren
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Car: nissan 720 1982-1985
Location: 'up in the sticks' MT

Re: FAQ's: Look Here Before Creating a Thread

Postby dreadsiren » Tue Dec 20, 2011 11:30 pm

found the almost complete service manual for free, it has all of the wiring diagrams and starting/charging/firing & gauge/acc troubleshooting, its for 1984 but applies to more years than just that. figured the link would be handiest here

http://asavage.dyndns.org/Nissan/displa ... Page=front

*edit, here is the link to the rest of the workshop manuals they have available on their website

http://asavage.dyndns.org/Nissan/index.html

they have the 82 720, the 84 720, ld20 & ld28 diesel, and EFI analyzer manuals there
Last edited by dreadsiren on Fri Apr 20, 2012 1:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Davezilla
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1986 720 4x4

Re: FAQ's: Look Here Before Creating a Thread

Postby Davezilla » Sat Dec 24, 2011 11:47 pm

dreadsiren wrote:found the almost complete service manual for free, it has all of the wiring diagrams and starting/charging/firing & gauge/acc troubleshooting, its for 1984 but applies to more years than just that. figured the link would be handiest here

http://asavage.dyndns.org/Nissan/displa ... Page=front

Big Thanks for that link!! as some of you know I bought mine as a non running fixer upper project, having the wiring diagrams will definitely help get mine on the road a LOT sooner.

1983Nissan720
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Re: FAQ's: Look Here Before Creating a Thread

Postby 1983Nissan720 » Mon Apr 02, 2012 3:45 am

I wonder if I could make a few contributions to this particular thread?

My contributions are:
*Pictures and/or illustrations of what each model year 720 pickup looked like from 1980 to early 1986.
*Clues as to what engine is under the hood (especially diesel models)
*Trim levels (Deluxe, Sport Truck/Li'l Hustler)

Thank you,



Ben Edge (1983Nissan720)

marclamb1112
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Car: 1981 Datsun 720 2wd pickup standard 5 speed

Re: FAQ's: Look Here Before Creating a Thread

Postby marclamb1112 » Tue Apr 17, 2012 10:36 pm

does anyone know where to find the wiring diagram for the stereo. the kid that had my truck i have now two owners before me wired the speakers without using the factory wires so i have no clues what wires are for what.
any help would be greatly appreciated very loud truck and i have no music :(
Marc (1981 720 2wd king cab 5speed)

dreadsiren
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Car: nissan 720 1982-1985
Location: 'up in the sticks' MT

Re: FAQ's: Look Here Before Creating a Thread

Postby dreadsiren » Fri Apr 20, 2012 1:43 pm

it should have the same layout as the 82 here is a link to its workshop manual stereo wiring diagram for the 82 king cab...
http://asavage.dyndns.org/Nissan/displa ... age=20-086
hope this helps, if not I'll crack into my 82's old harness and see.

marclamb1112
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Car: 1981 Datsun 720 2wd pickup standard 5 speed

Re: FAQ's: Look Here Before Creating a Thread

Postby marclamb1112 » Mon Apr 23, 2012 6:35 pm

thats exactly what i needed thanks

808NeSan
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Re: FAQ's: Look Here Before Creating a Thread

Postby 808NeSan » Tue Jun 12, 2012 4:59 am

thanks dude this exactley what i was looking 4.

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cws1983
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Car: 1984 Nissan 720 4x4 KC

Re: FAQ's: Look Here Before Creating a Thread

Postby cws1983 » Mon Oct 22, 2012 12:05 pm

Does anyone know if 235/75/15 will fit on a 84 nissan 4x4 with stock ride height?>

chaoc
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Car: 1985 Nissan 720 4x4

Re: FAQ's: Look Here Before Creating a Thread

Postby chaoc » Sat Nov 17, 2012 4:01 pm

cws, they will. In fact, you can put on 30x9.5 15R which is an inch or so taller.

dat84king
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Car: 1984 Datsun Kingcab

Re: FAQ's: Look Here Before Creating a Thread

Postby dat84king » Sun Jun 02, 2013 5:29 pm

I am new to this website. I decided to join because I just recently bought a 1984 Nissan 720 King Cab, 2 wheel drive, 2.4l 4 cyl, automatic on the floor. I have a question for anybody that might know. Did my 1984 Nissan 720 King Cab ever come with automatic on the column? The only reason why I ask is because I am a mini-trucker and would like to convert my truck from automatic on the floor to automatic on the column. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

aratsun86
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Car: 1986 nissan 720 2wd

Re: FAQ's: Look Here Before Creating a Thread

Postby aratsun86 » Mon Jun 02, 2014 4:10 pm

Okay I have an 86 nissan 720 2wd.. had a z20. I swapped a z24 into it out of an 86 hardbody.. so all the plugs match up except the distributor plug, (z20 5 wires, z24 4) does anyone know what the 5 wires go to? And if it is okay to lose one to run the z24? Much appreciated! - tara

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Superflyers
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Car: 1982 Nissan Datsun king cab pickup truck
2010 Nissan versa
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Re: FAQ's: Look Here Before Creating a Thread

Postby Superflyers » Thu Jul 17, 2014 4:00 pm

were would i find/buy vaccum lines. mine has never been changed i think, however the truck is running fine

Gridlock3149
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Car: 1985 nissan 720 2.4 4 cylinder 4x4

Re: FAQ's: Look Here Before Creating a Thread

Postby Gridlock3149 » Fri Sep 11, 2015 12:06 am

Hello, I just purchased a 1985 nissan 720, 2.4, 4 cylinder, 4x4. Popped 5th gear, overdrive doesn't work, 1st and reverse are difficult to get into place at a stop( getting the whole tranny rebuilt). The truck runs and drives without noticeable major issues but the cab reeks of gasses(emissions). Catalytic converter, front pipe and tail pipe are considerably rusted to hell. It's missing the muffler and the intermediate pipe. Catalytic converter doesn't prove to be rusted through considering its current drivability. I'm replacing the entire exhaust system (seems necessary). Was told the truck would go without being driven for extended periods of time for the last few years (from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, mostly being used for 4x4 transportation in the winter months. Any thoughts on how to turn this relic into a model of mechanical efficiency, beyond my current intention to replace the exhaust system and rebuild the transmission will be openly accepted and greatly appreciated. My goal is to apply additional mechanical properties with the results consistent to allowing this 4 cylinder to run like a top in high elevation circumstances for long distance periods. I have thoughts of installing a trans oil cooler and an engine oil cooler. Considering a high performance air intake. New high performance radiator and fan. Colder plugs potentially and new vacuum lines. Am I on the right track to make this a reality? Also, the truck came from Montana and was relocated to Colorado. A few people have informed me how, because the truck has regularly been operating in high elevation circumstances for a majority of its life; that factor alone wold enable the truck to function properly at high elevations in its current status. Is this valid? If so, why does that work? Thanks for any and all answers and/or suggestions in regards to the fulfillment of my curiosity towards the subject I'm addressing.

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waynosworld
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Re: FAQ's: Look Here Before Creating a Thread

Postby waynosworld » Fri Sep 11, 2015 2:35 pm

Welcome :)
You should start a thread of your own in the 720 section for your truck. :biggrin:
Keep in mind that the engine in the truck is a smog/emissions engine, you can tune it up, but it will never be a high performance engine, and those engines are famous for blowing head gaskets, Nissan suggests that each head bolt be re-torqued every tune up, there is no particular order, just as long as all of them get done.
Gridlock3149 wrote:Hello, I just purchased a 1985 nissan 720, 2.4, 4 cylinder, 4x4. Popped 5th gear, overdrive doesn't work, 1st and reverse are difficult to get into place at a stop( getting the whole tranny rebuilt). The truck runs and drives without noticeable major issues but the cab reeks of gasses(emissions). Catalytic converter, front pipe and tail pipe are considerably rusted to hell. It's missing the muffler and the intermediate pipe. Catalytic converter doesn't prove to be rusted through considering its current drivability. I'm replacing the entire exhaust system (seems necessary). Was told the truck would go without being driven for extended periods of time for the last few years (from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, mostly being used for 4x4 transportation in the winter months. Any thoughts on how to turn this relic into a model of mechanical efficiency, beyond my current intention to replace the exhaust system and rebuild the transmission will be openly accepted and greatly appreciated. My goal is to apply additional mechanical properties with the results consistent to allowing this 4 cylinder to run like a top in high elevation circumstances for long distance periods. I have thoughts of installing a trans oil cooler and an engine oil cooler. Considering a high performance air intake. New high performance radiator and fan. Colder plugs potentially and new vacuum lines. Am I on the right track to make this a reality? Also, the truck came from Montana and was relocated to Colorado. A few people have informed me how, because the truck has regularly been operating in high elevation circumstances for a majority of its life; that factor alone wold enable the truck to function properly at high elevations in its current status. Is this valid? If so, why does that work? Thanks for any and all answers and/or suggestions in regards to the fulfillment of my curiosity towards the subject I'm addressing.

Zjohnson112
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Aug 03, 2018 10:04 pm
Car: 1984 datsun 720 4x4

Re: FAQ's: Look Here Before Creating a Thread

Postby Zjohnson112 » Sat Aug 04, 2018 10:30 am

How about, Degrees for timing? Common numbers or what works best..


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